My Freelance Work

  • Quest for Fire

    Emmy Magazine9/13/18

    One of the challenges of being cast in a new adaptation of a George R. R. Martin property is this: at least some fans are probably expecting Syfy’s Nightflyers, which is based on Martin’s 1980 novella by the same name, to be a bit like A Song of Ice and Fire but in space — complete with shocking mother-of-dragons moments.

    “I love Game of Thrones,” Jodie Turner-Smith says. “But Nightflyers is something completely different. I’m not walking out of any fires naked. Yet.”

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  • TV Execs Break Down How They’re Working Toward Diversity

    Variety8/28/18

    When ABC revealed that “Black-ish” would have a spinoff, sister network Freeform raced to sign the series up. For Freeform, “Grown-ish” would hit all the right notes — it came with a proven pedigree in creator Kenya Barris, and even more important, featured a young, diverse cast.

    The decision was a wise one, indeed. “We chased the show that became ‘Grown-ish’ because we very much wanted a diverse comedy on our slate, and who better to partner with than Kenya?” explains Freeform exec VP, programming and development, Karey Burke. “It very quickly drew new viewers to our channel and ‘Siren,’ which follows it, has a more diverse audience than ever.”

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  • ‘Patrick Melrose,’ ‘The Americans’ and more turn the past into must-see escapism

    L.A. Times Envelope8/09/18

    Making good TV isn’t easy. Making good TV that takes place in the past or the future – that’s exponentially harder. And that’s a lesson “This Is Us” creator/showrunner Dan Fogelman, whose family drama was nominated for an Emmy award in July, says he’s learned the hard way.

    “When I got into this business, I thought, ‘If I got a chance it’d be so easy to make great TV,'” he says. “But it’s so difficult and challenging – and when you add a time period not your own it’s nearly impossible. I’m amazed anyone pulls it off.”

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  • All great TV episodes have a key scene at their heart — especially the Emmy nominees

    L.A. Times Envelope - 8/09/18

    Whether you’ve got eight, 13 or 24 episodes in the can, boiling an entire season of a television show down to one critical, hopefully award-winning moment might seem unfair. But in some cases, that’s all it takes: One well-executed interaction or particularly poignant scene can be the final reason why an Emmy voter tips your way. Writers from this year’s comedy and drama nominees all had unique takes on what might be their statue-worthy scene and 10 of the 12 shared their thoughts with The Envelope. If you’re saving these episodes for future viewing (and why on Earth would you do that?), you might want to skip reading this article.

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  • 5 things to know about caring for your American flag — and how to retire it

    Today.com - 7/03/18

    The Fourth of July means a lot of things for Americans: A day off work, a hot grill, the beach, and fireworks when night falls.

    But the holiday is, at heart, the celebration of our independence — and makes us think all over again about our American flag.

    Still, while many people know to salute the flag or say the Pledge of Allegiance, not nearly as many know just how to care for their flags — including how to handle them when it comes to “retirement.” For one thing, it is actually OK to burn your flag when its time comes.

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  • Inside the office — and psyche? — of ‘Late Night’s’ Seth Meyers

    L.A. Times Envelope - 6/19/18

    “Late Night” host Seth Meyers may have exited his home of nearly 13 years, “Saturday Night Live,” four years ago, but a quick peep into his office proves that he’s brought a lot of memories of those years with him. Meyers’ modest corner space on 30 Rock’s eighth floor is rife with show props and co-workers’ farewell gifts, but a deeper look reveals signs that he’s also moving forward (an action figure from his “The Awesomes” animated Hulu series; his wife Alexi Ashe’s district attorney’s office badge on a plaque). Meyers invited The Envelope into his inner sanctum to talk about personal space, making room for the future and what’s up with that giant spoon in the corner.

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  • Two decades later, ‘Waco’ serves as a ‘cautionary tale’ of the disenfranchised

    L.A. Times Envelope - 6/19/18

    It would be easy to dismiss Paramount Network’s “Waco” miniseries as old news: After all, what could a 1993 standoff between FBI agents and religious leader David Koresh tell us about today? Turns out, quite a lot, particularly with Michael Shannon (as FBI negotiator Gary Noesner) and Taylor Kitsch (Koresh) starring. The Envelope sat down with both actors to revisit the scene of the crime, talk about the concept of “bad guys” and consider who would win in a battle between General Zod and one of the X-Men.

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  • Michelle Dockery puts Lady Mary behind her to wield a gun on the western ‘Godless’

    L.A. Times Envelope - 6/19/18

    It’s been three years since “Downton Abbey” signed off and Michelle Dockery went from being Lady Mary to an actress who needed her next gig. Fortunately, two came along in short order: TNT’s “Good Behavior,” which wrapped its second season in December with no word yet as to a third, and Netflix’s 2017 limited series “Godless.” In both, she’s played pretty much the opposite of upright Mary: a con artist finding love and a Western widow, respectively. But don’t think she’s left her “Downton” days behind – as Dockery tells The Envelope, she’ll only be concerned about that series trailing her when people stop bringing it up.

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  • Emmys 2018: Late-Night Contenders Make the Political Personal

    Variety - 6/18/18

    Flipping channels during TV’s after-hours used to have a familiar coziness: Joke-filled monologues with toothless political barbs, followed by a sketch, followed by interviews in which guests hawked their latest projects. But that’s old school.

    Today, amid fierce competition for eyeballs and viral video segments, late-night broadcast hosts and their cable brethren, most of whom pack a guest-free half-hour once a week with headlines and humor, have been using authenticity and deeply personal stories to turn their shows into must-see television.

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  • ‘The Fosters,’ ‘Riverdale,’ ‘Runaways’ Reach Beyond Youth Programming

    Variety - 6/14/18

    Creating content that works on multi-generational levels is, in some sense, nothing new: “family” programming has been around since television began. But the concept of telling smart — not sappy — stories about young people and their parents, with both generations portrayed as complex and sympathetic characters, and therefore drawing audiences across demographics, is somewhat fresher.

    “Steven Universe,” which is among Cartoon Network’s top five programs with its key demo of kids 6-11, but also ranks high among adults, is animated, but it’s in good company among popular live-action series “Grown-ish,” “Marvel’s Runaways,” “The Fosters” and “Riverdale” — all ostensibly young adult shows that have attracted and retained strong adult audiences, too.

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