My Freelance Work

  • Watch what happens when Andy Cohen talks about his growing empire

    L.A. Times Envelope6/15/17

    Andy Cohen is a busy man. “I subscribe to the [Ryan] Seacrest-ian model of employment, which is to keep adding things that I love,” he says, and his résumé proves it. The former Bravo exec is now host and executive producer of the network’s “Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen” and EP of “The Real Housewives” franchise. He has a SiriusXM “Radio Andy” channel, is a bestselling author with his Andy Cohen Books imprint, tours with Anderson Cooper and is the host-executive producer for Bravo’s new “Andy Cohen’s Then & Now” and the revived “Love Connection” on Fox.

    But that crazy workload didn’t stop him from offering The Envelope’s Randee Dawn the interviewer’s seat on the set of “Watch” and … well, watch what happened.

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  • Dynamic Duos

    Emmy Magazine6/15/17

    Great casting makes great TV duos, but even with supremely talented actors, there’s an unpredictable X factor in any pairing. Randee Dawn chatted up five terrific twosomes to find out what makes them click —
    and why you just gotta have friends.

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  • ‘Better Call Saul’ stars Jonathan Banks and Giancarlo Esposito break bad a second time

    L.A. Times Envelope6/08/17

    Walter White may have been “Breaking Bad’s” antihero protagonist, but at least half of that iconic series was indelibly stamped by two of its supporting characters: Giancarlo Esposito’s meticulous meth-king businessman Gus Fring and Jonathan Banks’ cop-turned-hitman Mike Ehrmantraut, both of whom (spoiler alert!) died in the series. But “Better Call Saul,” which takes place before those events, has worked a TV miracle by giving Gus and Mike a second chance to make a bad impression — in the best possible way. The Envelope joined the actors at AMC’s New York offices amid a thunderous rainstorm that provided the perfect soundtrack for their chat.

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  • Costume Designers Bend Period Rules for Today’s TV Audiences

    Variety - 6/01/17

    Had Phoebe de Gaye wanted to go for total accuracy in portraying the era of Elizabeth of York, who was married to England’s King Henry VII and mother to King Henry VIII, she could have spent a lot of time with extreme headdresses and dangling facial gauzes or veils. But those watching “The White Princess” may note that neither are present in the Starz series.

    “I would have loved to experiment with those things, but headdresses would have interfered with composing shots, and the gauzes would just have come between the audience and the actor,” the costume designer says. “You want to create a a window into the past for today’s audience, so you give it complexity and conviction, but you don’t want it to feel like a history lesson.”

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  • Production Designers Create Sets for TV That Support the Actors Without Overpowering Them

    Variety - 6/01/17

    Among the large ensemble cast assembled for FX’s “American Horror Story’s” sixth season was a rookie – one that would appear in 85% of the finished series: Roanoke House.

    The 8,000-sq.-ft. built-from-scratch structure – reflecting gothic, colonial, art nouveau, and Shaker architecture – was production designer Andrew Murdock’s crowning achievement, and a star of the show.

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  • Real People Pose Real Challenges for TV Hair and Makeup Artists

    Variety - 6/01/17

    Albert Einstein is one of the most recognizable figures of the 20th century, not just for his groundbreaking scientific theories, but for his look — and crowning halo of late-life gray hair. So in trying to tell the scientist’s life story in National Geographic’s “Genius,” how would a hair and makeup department recreate the man, while also ensuring the look didn’t feel like a costume?

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  • ‘Westworld,’ ‘Black Mirror’ and other tech-driven shows delve into what it means to be human

    L.A. Times Envelope - 5/26/17

    Sticky big-picture questions are meat and potatoes this season for such series as “Humans,” HBO’s “Westworld,” USA’s “Mr. Robot” and Netflix’s “Black Mirror.” At first glance, these shows may seem to be about subservient robots, murderous mechanical bees or modern-day computer hackers who aspire to change the world with their code, but dismiss them as “mere” science fiction at your peril. They feature some of the most philosophically complex, thoughtful storytelling on TV, and even though they take place in alternative future universes, they are relevant to today’s tech-obsessed world.

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  • ‘Homeland’s’ Rupert Friend found much to admire in Peter Quinn

    L.A. Times Envelope - 5/26/17

    It’s been a traumatic couple of years for fans of Rupert Friend’s “Homeland” character, Peter Quinn, a heroic CIA paramilitary agent who appeared to have expired multiple times before his actual exit at the end of Season 6. But thanks to Friend’s sensitive yet steely portrayal of a man damaged outside and in from his experiences, Quinn was able to rise from his ashes and go out in a blaze of glory — and the ultimate sacrifice. The British-born Friend took a moment while here in his adopted hometown to talk about the power of the imagination, Quinn’s exit and Roald Dahl for The Envelope.

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  • Fictional political TV shows face dilemmas as reality outpaces anything they could imagine

    L.A. Times Envelope - 5/18/17

    Series like Netflix’s “House of Cards,” CBS’ “Madam Secretary” and HBO’s “Veep” regularly take us into fictional versions of the White House, while others, like “Berlin Station” on Epix, Showtime’s “Homeland” and “Good Fight” deal with the intelligence and legal communities affected by politics and the administration. Yet none of their showrunners planned to be running a writers room in a world that had put a real estate mogul/reality show star in the highest office in the United States government.

    So how do you write about a fictional White House when the real-world version is beyond anything you might have considered putting on TV?

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    CNN’s Reliable Sources called this story the “headline of the day”

  • Dan Stevens likes the wit and the ‘special kind of weird’ in ‘Legion’

    L.A. Times Envelope - 5/18/17

    Dan Stevens is not the doomed hero of “Downton Abbey,” Matthew Crowley — and hasn’t been for more than four years. His departure from the wildly popular “Masterpiece” series left him room to build an impressive résumé of feature projects (“Beauty and the Beast,” “The Ticket,” “Colossal”) and what might be considered the anti-“Downton” of TV series, FX’s odd and outrageous “Legion,” from “Fargo” creator Noah Hawley. Yet while Stevens won’t shun the series that broke him internationally, he’d like everyone to know that right now, he’s indulging his weird side — which made the wax-bust-filled House of Wax bar adjacent to Brooklyn’s Alamo Drafthouse movie theater the perfect place to meet up with The Envelope.

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